Category Archives: History

A Day of Remembrance

war-cemetery

The eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918. The date and time that marked the end of fighting in the war that was supposed to end all wars. Known variously as Armistice Day, Veterans Day and Remembrance Day, November 11th is now a holiday celebrated in many nations throughout the world.

Both my grandfather, Walter Leonard Dilliplane, and his younger brother, Alvin Freeman Dilliplane, served in the Great War. They bravely fought to liberate France from German occupation. My grandfather was one of the lucky ones. He came home, got married and eventually had three sons, the youngest being my father.

His brother Alvin was not as lucky. He was killed in action on September 7, 1918. He died three days shy of his 21st birthday and 2 months and 4 days shy of the armistice.

Alvin was a hero on the battlefield – perhaps even a bit reckless. On September 5, 1918, the Harrisburg Telegraph, in reporting on battles near Fismette, France in the previous month, included the following excerpt, “Private Alvin F. Dilliplane, of Pottstown, another Pennsylvania boy, showed remarkable bravery at the self-imposed task of rescuing wounded after they had been abandoned.”

For his actions at the Fismete battle, Alvin received an official citation for bravery. It stated that “Private Alvin F. Dilliplane, with utter disregard for personal safety, went forward in daylight to the rescue of wounded men approximately 400 yards in front of our lines, succeeding one of them at that time and the other after dark.”

It would be nice to think that the men he rescued survived and returned to their families. But I have no way of knowing who they were or what happened to them in the long run. For his part, Alvin never made it home. He is buried at Oise-Aisne American Cemetery in Picardie, France.

And so on this Veteran’s Days please take some time to remember those who served in all the various wars and conflicts and especially those who gave the ultimate sacrifice.

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Burials at James Fort

Burials at James Fort

This photo, taken in July of 2012, is of burial sites within the original James Fort of the Virginia colony. These burials are believed to have occurred circa 1607. Until recently, most historians thought that the site of the original fort was now beneath the James River. But archaeologists recently discovered parts of the 3 outer walls of the fort, as well as graves and other structures that were located within the fort.

King James Bible Celebrates 400 Years

Commissioned by King James I in 1604, the King James Version of the Bible is an English language translation by scholars associated with the Church of England. The initial translation was completed in 1611 and over the course of the next 150 years or so it became the dominant version in use by (English-speaking) Protestant churches and their parishioners. It remained dominant until about the mid-20th Century, when newer translations began to emerge and take precedence.

As genealogists and family historians, many of us may have one of more of these on our shelves – or at least wish we did – since quite often the Bible was a valued possession of our ancestors. Many of these old Bibles, excluding the ones I’ve inherited (of course), contain pages recording births, deaths and marriages within the family. As Murphy’s Law would have it, these pages within the Bibles I’ve inherited have been left blank :( .

While not directly relevant to genealogy, I recently came across this posting on the influence of the King James Version of the Bible on the English language on OpenCulture.com [link]. If you’ve got a spare minute or two, the videos attached to the above mentioned post are worth the watch.